Housing and Shelter

    Results: 17

  • Adult Residential Care Homes (3)
    BH-8400.6000-040

    Adult Residential Care Homes

    BH-8400.6000-040

    Residential homes or facilities that offer personal care and individual attention for older adults, people with disabilities and other populations whose limitations prevent them from living alone. Adult residential care homes (which are also known as board and care homes, residential board and care homes, personal care homes or residential care facilities for the elderly) generally provide a room (which may be shared), meals and supervision; and may specialize in populations with specific needs such as people with Alzheimer's disease or those with developmental disabilities. Services vary from facility to facility but may include dietary and housekeeping services, monitoring of prescription medication, social and recreational opportunities, incontinence care and assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living. Some homes provide secured surroundings for confused elderly adults who may wander while others are unable to accept individuals who are incontinent or who have severe problems with memory loss. There is considerable variation among these homes in terms of size, resident mix, daily charges and services. Most but not all adult residential care homes or facilities are licensed by the state in which they are located.
  • Assisted Living Facilities (2)
    BH-8400.6000-060

    Assisted Living Facilities

    BH-8400.6000-060

    Residential facilities specially constructed or converted to combine housing and supportive services in a "homelike" environment with the goal of maximizing the individual functioning and autonomy of residents. Assisted living facilities generally have private apartment-style accommodations with walk in showers, wide doors for wheelchair access, emergency pull cord systems and other special amenities; and offer the individualized array of personal care services which will allow each resident to function as independently as possible. Services vary from facility to facility, but usually include three meals a day with special diets, as required; housekeeping and linen services; personal laundry; social and recreational activities; transportation to medical appointments, stores and community services; money management assistance; assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living; medication management and administration; therapy and pharmacy services; and wellness and exercise programs. Assisted living facilities may be licensed by the state or may not require a license depending on the area in which they are located.
  • Emergency Shelter (7)
    BH-1800

    Emergency Shelter

    BH-1800

    Programs that provide a temporary or transitional place to stay for newcomers, people who are in crisis, or homeless individuals in the community.
  • Family Permanent Supportive Housing (1)
    BH-8400.2000

    Family Permanent Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.2000

    Programs that provide permanent affordable housing and supportive services for families whose current housing situation is unstable with the objective of preventing family homelessness, preserving families at risk for separation and reunifying families that have been separated. The program generally provides intensive case management involving regular home visits, development of a family care plan, and coordination of services identified by the plan which may include health care, substance abuse treatment, counseling and other mental health services, parenting skills training, family literacy services, tutoring, vocational training, money management and other life skills training, recreational activities, child care and transportation. Some programs focus specifically on families involved in the child welfare system or other family subgroups.
  • Home Rehabilitation Loans (1)
    BH-3000.3550-360

    Home Rehabilitation Loans

    BH-3000.3550-360

    Programs that provide loans for income-eligible people who want to repair or modify their homes or mobile homes to make them energy-efficient, attractive, safe and free of health hazards; or which help eligible individuals find loans for this purpose. Most loan programs cover major repairs, system upgrades and replacements (e.g., plumbing, heating or electrical systems) but not minor repairs. Included are conventional home rehabilitation loans, deferred loans (in which payments are deferred until the home is sold) and forgivable loans (in which all or a part of the loan is forgiven if the borrower resides in the home for a specified period of time). The forgiven part of a forgivable loan amounts to a contingent grant. If the borrower sells the home prior to the specified time period, all or part of the loan is due. A common variation is to have portions of the loan forgiven gradually over a period of years.
  • Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing (2)
    BH-8400.3000

    Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.3000

    Programs that provide affordable, community-based housing for individuals and families who have experienced long-term or chronic homelessness and have been diagnosed as having a physical or developmental disability, a severe mental illness, substance abuse problems or HIV/AIDS; or are members of another designated group within the homeless population. Structures may include apartments, single-family houses, duplexes, group homes or single-room occupancy housing. Permanent supportive housing programs generally provide residents with the rights of tenancy under state or local landlord/tenant laws and are linked to services designed to meet residents' needs. Supportive services vary depending on the resident population. Most programs offer some type of case management and housing support, but may also offer more intensive mental health, substance abuse, vocational, employment or other services which help promote independent living. Supportive services may be offered on-site or off-site, or be provided by a mobile service team.
  • Housing Authorities (2)
    BH-8300.3000

    Housing Authorities

    BH-8300.3000

    City, county, or state housing offices that provide information about eligibility for and vacancies in the subsidized housing properties that are under their jurisdiction. Housing authorities accept Section 8 applications, provide Section 8 vouchers, make approved Section 8 rental payments and administer public housing communities while in certain rural areas, the housing finance agency may play this role.
  • Housing Counseling (1)
    BH-3700

    Housing Counseling

    BH-3700

    Programs that provide comprehensive assistance for people who want to rent or purchase housing including information and guidance about buying and rental costs; how to select affordable housing that meets individual needs; and how to provide for insurance, maintenance and other requirements related to acquiring and paying for housing.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing (1)
    BH-7000.4600

    Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600

    Housing programs that make rental housing more readily available to homeless people and/or low-income individuals and families (those below 50% of the area's median income). Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations.
  • Maternity Homes (1)
    LJ-5000.5000

    Maternity Homes

    LJ-5000.5000

    Programs that provide shelter, care and support services, which often include counseling regarding future plans and instruction in child care and development, for pregnant women who are unable to remain in their own homes.
  • Nursing Facilities (2)
    LL-6000

    Nursing Facilities

    LL-6000

    Inpatient health care facilities that provide nursing and personal care over an extended period of time (usually more than 30 days) for people who require convalescent care at a level which is less than that provided in an acute facility and/or for chronically ill or frail elderly individuals or people with disabilities.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Senior Housing Information and Referral (1)
    BH-8500.8000

    Senior Housing Information and Referral

    BH-8500.8000

    Programs that maintain information about retirement residences, residential care facilities and nursing homes, and link older adults who are looking for alternative living options with appropriate independent or supervised living resources.
  • Sober Living Homes (2)
    RX-8500.8000

    Sober Living Homes

    RX-8500.8000

    Alcohol and other drug-free residences (which may be single family dwellings, duplexes, multiplex apartment buildings or communal residential facilities) for people who are recovering from an alcohol and/or other drug use disorder and need a sober environment in order to sustain an abstinent lifestyle. Residents are free to organize and participate in support group meetings or any other activity that helps them maintain sobriety, but neither the homes nor the residents provide treatment, recovery, detoxification services or other supportive services; and supervision of individual recovery is not provided. Because they provide no services, sober living homes do not require a license but are generally subject to landlord/tenant laws.
  • Street Outreach Programs (4)
    PH-8000

    Street Outreach Programs

    PH-8000

    Programs that are staffed by outreach workers who spend time with people who live on the street, build relationships with them, identify and address their immediate needs (e.g., crisis intervention, food, clean clothing, hygiene kits, blankets, someone to listen) and provide information about and linkage to longer-term forms of support such as shelter, counseling, drug and alcohol detoxification and rehabilitation, care/case management and, where applicable, family reunification services. Street outreach programs may be staffed by volunteers or peers who were formerly homeless; and may target special populations such as homeless youth at risk for sexual abuse or exploitation, veterans, or people with specific medical or mental health conditions, or be available to the larger homeless population.
  • Sweat Equity Programs (1)
    BH-7000.8100-800

    Sweat Equity Programs

    BH-7000.8100-800

    Programs that make low-cost housing available to people who have very low incomes by organizing a group of volunteers to design and construct houses which are then sold at cost and at no interest to individuals who qualify by making a small down payment and investing a specified number of hours of "sweat equity" working on the project.
  • USDA Rural Home Purchase Loan Programs (1)
    BH-3500.3400-850

    USDA Rural Home Purchase Loan Programs

    BH-3500.3400-850

    Programs offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Housing Service that make home loans and loan guarantees available to rural families with an income below 80% of the median income level in the communities where they live who do not qualify for a conventional loan. Direct loans are made for the purchase of a new home or for new home construction including site preparation. The loan guarantee program guarantees loans made by private lenders. Under the terms of this program, families may borrow up to 100% of the appraised value of a home eliminating the need for a down payment, a barrier to home ownership frequently faced by families with low incomes.